Roman aqueducts

Brian G Turner

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What a riveting sounding title! But I'm a complete Romano-phile, so I'll cover anything on the topic. ;)

Also in preparation for the History board that I'll be creating soon.

Anyway, this article refers to how the Romans created holes and hurdles in their aquaducts to help reduce turbulence and keep a smooth flow of water.
 
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BAYLOR

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2000 plus years later , the Acqua Vergine Aqueduct is still us. A testament to the Romans great engineering skills.:cool:(y)
 

BAYLOR

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Yeah, but apart from the aqueducts, what have the Romans ever done for us?

The Pantheon building in Rome which is by far the best preserved Roman Building of all.:) Roman Law and organization is one of the pillars of Western Civilization. :unsure: :)


I think that as topics go , this one is quite interesting and deserves a revival because it also doesn't have time limitations on it. :)
 
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farntfar

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One of the prettiest examples of Roman aqueduct is the Pont du Gard, built about 2000 years ago in the beginning of the 1st century and still in pretty good nick.

1656875068198.png

It bridges the valley of the river Gard (surprisingly)and is only about 2 1/2 hours drive from a rather more modern bridge over the river Tarn, and also quite impressive, if less Roman.


Le viaduc of Millau, designed by Norman Foster, carries the A75 motorway, rather than water and was completed 18 years ago. It has a slightly different construction.

1656875853883.png
 

hitmouse

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One of the prettiest examples of Roman aqueduct is the Pont du Gard, built about 2000 years ago in the beginning of the 1st century and still in pretty good nick.

View attachment 91054
It bridges the valley of the river Gard (surprisingly)and is only about 2 1/2 hours drive from a rather more modern bridge over the river Tarn, and also quite impressive, if less Roman.


Le viaduc of Millau, designed by Norman Foster, carries the A75 motorway, rather than water and was completed 18 years ago. It has a slightly different construction.

View attachment 91056
When I was a kid I walked along the top of the P du G. No railings or anything. I dont think you can do that anymore.
 

farntfar

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When I was a kid I walked along the top of the P du G. No railings or anything. I dont think you can do that anymore.
You could certainly walk the second floor about 10 years ago when I was last there, but I'm not sure about the top (third floor), which is where the water flowed.
Incidentally, if you ever go, visit the town of Uzes, which is right nextdoor and is also lovely.
 

hitmouse

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You could certainly walk the second floor about 10 years ago when I was last there, but I'm not sure about the top (third floor), which is where the water flowed.
Incidentally, if you ever go, visit the town of Uzes, which is right nextdoor and is also lovely.
In the early 80s you could walk right along the top. Health and safety were conspicuously absent. There were regular gaps where you could climb down into the water channel, covered by the top slabs, if you got too freaked out. As far as I remember it was possible to walk through the channel upright, but it was a long time ago and I was in my teens.
 

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