August Fantasy Poll

Discussion in 'Book Club' started by dwndrgn, Jul 28, 2005.

?

Which one would you discuss?

  1. Across the Nightingale Floor, Lian Hearn

    5 vote(s)
    29.4%
  2. Invisible Cities, Italo Calvino

    2 vote(s)
    11.8%
  3. Od Magic, Patricia McKillip

    2 vote(s)
    11.8%
  4. Myst, The Book of Atrus, Robyn and Rand Miller

    2 vote(s)
    11.8%
  5. Curse of the Mistwraith, Janny Wurts

    6 vote(s)
    35.3%
  1.  
    dwndrgn

    dwndrgn Fierce Vowelless One Staff Member

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    I have placed here a description of this month's choices. Here are the descriptions for the choices:

    Across the Nightingale Floor, Lian Hearn
    From Publishers Weekly:
    Mystical powers and martial arts rampage through this pseudo-Japanese story, the first of a projected trilogy by newcomer Hearn, with an abandon that's head spinning. From the entrance of the 16-year-old hero, Takeo, as he is about to be swatted down by a mounted horseman and the way he can become invisible or make a duplicate of himself when he needs to, to the head-rolling decapitations that follow interminably, the impossible becomes the semiplausible. Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information, Inc.


    Invisible Cities, Italo Calvino
    From Amazon.com:
    "Kublai Khan does not necessarily believe everything Marco Polo says when he describes the cities visited on his expeditions, but the emperor of the Tartars does continue listening to the young Venetian with greater attention and curiosity than he shows any other messenger or explorer of his." So begins Italo Calvino's compilation of fragmentary urban images. As Marco tells the khan about Armilla, which "has nothing that makes it seem a city, except the water pipes that rise vertically where the houses should be and spread out horizontally where the floors should be," the spider-web city of Octavia, and other marvelous burgs, it may be that he is creating them all out of his imagination, or perhaps he is recreating details of his native Venice over and over again, or perhaps he is simply recounting some of the myriad possible forms a city might take.


    Od Magic, Patricia McKillip
    From Booklist:
    Some 400 years earlier, Od, a formidable magician, broke the siege of Kelior and saved the land of Numis. She was allowed to found a school of magic in that city, and then she left to wander, surfacing only occasionally. Later the school became part of the king's palace and was controlled over the years by the rulers, who deemed wild magic dangerous. Along comes Brenden Vetch, invited by Od herself to become the school's gardener because of his intimate knowledge of the ways of plants. His talent, which he isn't aware of, is old magic, and his arrival triggers a rebellion at the school. There are no evil villains here, just misguided leaders who circumscribe magic. With lyrical prose, well-limned characterizations, vibrant action, a sense of the wonder of magic, and a generous dollop of romance, this is a story that will bind readers in its spell. Sally Estes
    Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

    Myst, The Book of Atrus, Robyn Miller, Rand Miller
    From Publishers Weekly
    In the acknowledgements to this first novel in a projected series, Wingrove is thanked by his coauthors, the Miller brothers, "for accomplishing the impossible." Wingrove's achievement certainly is improbable, at least judging from the sorry results of other computer-game-to-novel translations, like the paperback spinoffs of Doom. For with Wingrove's help, the Miller brothers, who created the Myst CD-ROM, have created a rollicking adventure tale full of engaging philosophical contemplations about the interplay between art and science. The authors follow their hero, Atrus, from breech birth (and his mother's resultant death) into his uneasy relationship with Gehn, the father who abandoned him at birth and who now wants to recreate the culture of the D'ni, beings whose writings could conjure?or at least discover?worlds. The narrative avoids the excesses that plagued Wingrove's Chung Kuo series while imparting the passion that the Millers channeled into the Myst CD-ROM. The result is a thrilling tale that will appeal not only to gamers but to all those who enjoy absorbing, fast-paced, well-constructed fantasy. Fifteen two-color illustrations, not seen by PW. Major ad/promo; author tour.
    Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc.


    Curse of the Mistwraith, Janny Wurts
    From Library Journal
    Two brothers, heirs to lands and locked in a blood feud, are drawn across a dimensional portal into a world where they are hailed as the promised saviors. As Arithon, the Master of Shadows, and his half-brother Lysaer, the Lord of Light, prepare to do battle against the Mistwraith, who has for centuries cloaked the world of Athera in darkness, they face an additional battle born of their mutual distrust of each other. Although fantasy author Wurts breaks no new ground in this series opener, her elaborate and vivid world-building and complex protagonists recommend this title to fans of epic fantasy.
    Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc.
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2005
  2.  
    Teresa Edgerton

    Teresa Edgerton Goblin Princess Staff Member

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    Why wasn't Curse of the Mistwraith included on the poll?

    Excellent job of digging up descriptions of the books, though!
     
  3.  
    dwndrgn

    dwndrgn Fierce Vowelless One Staff Member

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    That would be my fault for not seeing it. sorry!
     
  4.  
    dwndrgn

    dwndrgn Fierce Vowelless One Staff Member

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    There is currently a tie between Janny Wurts and Patricia McKillip - someone break the tie so we can start reading...
     
  5.  
    NSMike

    NSMike Tsurani Great One

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    Ha, 3 way tie, now.
     
  6.  
    kyektulu

    kyektulu White Wolf

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    I think I have just put Curse Of The MistWraith by Janny Wurts up in front ;)
     
  7.  
    Rosemary

    Rosemary The Wicked Sword Maiden

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    I prefer Janny Wurts - Curse of the Mistwraith.

    I have not like any of McKillips books so far.
     
  8.  
    dwndrgn

    dwndrgn Fierce Vowelless One Staff Member

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    It looks like Janny Wurts is the winner this month. Please procure your copy (this should be widely available in libraries) and give it a read.
     
  9.  
    Rachelkayla

    Rachelkayla New Member

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    Cool! I own it.
     
  10.  
    kyektulu

    kyektulu White Wolf

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    I will as it is on my must purchase list! :)
    Along with a thousand other books to add to my ever expanding libary!
     
  11.  
    NSMike

    NSMike Tsurani Great One

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    I don't know why, but I usually find Wurts' stuff hard to get through. I find myself saying every now and then, "Why do I care?" I tried to read this for the second time a few years ago, but I didn't make it through. Maybe this will give me an excuse to get through the whole thing so I can justify purchasing the whole series.
     

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