Asimov's 'Foundation' series

Discussion in 'Classic SF&F' started by The Wanderer, May 2, 2008.

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    The Wanderer

    The Wanderer Zelazny's Worlds

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    Hello, I'm back :eek:



    I quite liked the first book, though I wouldn't regard it as one of my favourite Science Fiction novels though, I'm now on Foundation and Empire and it's like the first, fairly intriguing though not massively mind-blowing

    any opinions?
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    Snowdog

    Snowdog New Member

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    I read my mum's copies when I was quite young, but she only had the second and third books, so I started with Foundation and Empire. I thought they were fantastic at the time and I still think they stack up. Reading Foundation many years later, I wasn't so gripped by that one and it certainly wasn't as exciting. These books were my first introduction to ideas like mind-reading, neuronic whips - in fact science fiction. So my assessment of these particular books could be a little skewed.

    I'd be interested what you think after you've finished Second Foundation because Foundation and Empire and Second Foundation go together as a pair while Foundation is almost a stand-alone book.
    Last edited: May 2, 2008
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    Razorback

    Razorback New Member

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    It was a long time ago when I read most of the Foundation books. I liked them a lot then, but can’t say that I found them mind-blowing or overwhelming. I suspect they were more impressive when newer and come across a bit dated now. Still, I think they’ve held up pretty well over the years and deserve considerations as classics in the genre.
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    dustinzgirl

    dustinzgirl Mod of Awesome

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    Forgot all about these! Actually, out of Asismov (which I haven't read since like, 8th grade or so) the Foundation were I think my favs because I'm not really great at complex stuff. ;)
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    j d worthington

    j d worthington Moderator Staff Member

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    My take on rereading these a few years ago: Foundation is a bit weak in spots, though still entertaining, and sets up the themes and ideas for the rest of the set; Foundation and Empire begins a bit stodgily, but picks up in the latter part (with Magnifico and the Mule -- I must admit that Magnifico remains one of my favorite characters in fiction); Second Foundation -- the worst aspect of that one is the teenage girl as protagonist: Asimov simply couldn't write that character convincingly. Other than that, I'd say it makes a rather strong finale to the original set.

    Overall, I found it still to hold a great deal of charm, and I enjoyed rereading it, though being a good deal older, I was much more aware of the young Asimov's faults than I had been when first encountering the books. I'd still list it among those I enjoy most from that era, for some of the humor, the somewhat wonky characters and (occasionally) approach, the innocent verve, and the ideas -- and, to a fair degree, the ability to tell a good tale as well....
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    Connavar

    Connavar New Member

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    The Mule makes original Foundation what it is.

    Foundation and Empire converted me from nun reader to SF fan.

    It might be dated somewhat to experianced SF readers this series but it worked for me..

    The first three books are really good. Foundation and Empire being the best,

    I agree with J.d that teenage girl protagonist ruined alittle Second Foundation.
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    Parson

    Parson This world is not my home

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    The Trilogy is a classic. Perhaps tame by today's standards, but still a cracking good yarn. I can remember being mesmerized (I don't want to say how many decades ago) by them. I remember feeling really bright when I figured out the location of the Second Foundation before it was revealed. I still sometimes think about it, which is something I can't say about the vast majority of the books I've ever read.

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